Consider Reconsidering. Marta Dyczok’s reflections on Ukraine’s story in media

“The taxi driver was repeating Putin’s narrative!” Vlad told me. The Ukrainian historian was in disbelief. He was on his way to the airport in Edmonton, in Canada

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Marta Dyczok

https://media.blubrry.com/hromadska_hvylya/static.hromadske.radio/2016/05/hr-en-15-03-16-dyczok.mp3
https://media.blubrry.com/hromadska_hvylya/static.hromadske.radio/2016/05/hr-en-15-03-16-dyczok.mp3
Consider Reconsidering. Marta Dyczok’s reflections on Ukraine’s story in media
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“The taxi driver was repeating Putin’s narrative!” Vlad told me. The Ukrainian historian was in disbelief. He was on his way to the airport in Edmonton, in Canada, a country where information on current affairs is readily available.

But international public opinion on Ukraine is divided, in part because of the way mass media has been representing the story. Rules of objective reporting require that all sides must be given voice. So Russian President Putin’s statements were reported, as well as those of US President Obama, Ukrainian President Poroshenko, German Chancellor Merkel, and others.Like this post? Support Hromadske Radio!

In a situation where information is being used as a weapon, this has worked against the goal of media providing accurate coverage, a clear picture of events in Ukraine, their causes, and consequences.

Each person interprets news reports through the prism of their own value systems and beliefs. So those who hold anti-American views because of US policy in the Middle East respond positively to Putin’s criticism of Obama. And to statements that the U.S. was behind the EuroMaidan protests, and is fuelling war in Ukraine to weaken Russia.

The Edmonton taxi driver was looking at Ukraine through his negative attitude towards the U.S. Until he picked up a Ukrainian historian who filled in the picture for him on the way to the airport. “I think I convinced him to reconsider his perspective,” Vlad said.